Melting Pot: 76ers’ global approach to a roster is working

first_imgMOST READ View comments ‘Stop romanticizing Pinoy resilience’ P16.5-M worth of aid provided for Taal Volcano eruption victims — NDRRMC Philadelphia — a melting pot of humanity for more than 300 years — has a basketball team probably as diverse as the city itself. The 76ers, 19-1 in their last 20 games and suddenly looking very much like an NBA Finals contender, will try to close out the Miami Heat and clinch their Eastern Conference opening series when they play host to Game 5 on Tuesday night.About a dozen languages and dialects can be spoken in the 76ers locker room at any time, but clearly, winning is a universal language.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown“It’s all basketball, but the true side of how people coach, speak, say, play the game is different,” 76ers coach Brett Brown said. “And that collection now that I have with everybody is like is a melting pot of all peoples experiences. That equals a team. I mean, I love it. I love the geo-political conversations. I love that diversity on the court, off the court. I enjoy it.”There might be no coach better-suited for this particular gig that Brown, too. Scientists seek rare species survivors amid Australia flames The poise shows, with the rookie shining in his first playoffs.Embiid, also in his first playoffs and with a mask protecting his surgically repaired face, has handled playing injured with ease. Belinelli has been a steadying force since he got to Philadelphia two months ago. Saric has been doing things in these playoffs that can draw comparisons to what that countrymen Drazen Petrovic and Peja Stojakovic did before him. Ilyasova has been a key player for Philadelphia since getting rescued from Atlanta in February.They all think differently, many learned the game differently, and the backgrounds are wildly different.But it works.A record 62 players from 33 countries were on playoff rosters across the NBA this season, and no one had more of them than Philadelphia — the 76ers have seven international guys with them for the postseason, matching Utah for the league lead.“My English isn’t that good, Dario’s isn’t that good, but we try to be a great group,” Belinelli said. “And we are. We go to dinner all together, we spend a lot of time together in the locker room after practice. It’s just part of the work, I think. Having all these guys from different parts of the world, it’s a good thing.”Brown, a coach in three Olympics, couldn’t agree more.“This global instinct and sort of global feeling that we have in Philadelphia interests me very much,” Brown said. “I embrace it. For me, it’s another layer of why I enjoy coaching this team.” Jo Koy draws ire for cutting through Cebu City traffic with ‘wang-wang’ Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Green group flags ‘overkill’ use of plastic banderitas in Manila Sto. Niño feastcenter_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. He spent nearly two decades living overseas, spending most of that time coaching in Australia before getting hired by the San Antonio Spurs — another franchise that has found championship ingredients from all over the world — back in 2002. Brown went to Philadelphia in 2013, took loss after loss after loss for his first four seasons when The Process was playing itself out, and now is reaping the rewards.The 76ers are young. They’re brash. They’re fearless. And they’re legit.“A lot of the guys growing up overseas, we have that European style of play,” Simmons said. “It’s a lot different than the U.S. style.”Simmons is still a kid, in the NBA sense. He’s 21. But he’s already seen the world with a basketball in hand: He’s played all over Australia, represented his country in Lithuania at the FIBA World U17 Championships as a 15-year-old, ended up going to high school in Florida and spent his lone year of college at LSU.“I’ve seen a lot,” Simmons said. “I’ve played everywhere.”ADVERTISEMENT Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Common goal Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ LATEST STORIES FILE – From left are file photos showing members of the Philadelphia 76ers basketball team. Philadelphia’s six leading scorers so far in the playoffs, in order, from left: Ben Simmons, Australia; Dario Saric, Croatia; Joel Embiid, Cameroon; JJ Redick, U.S.; Marci Belinelli, Italy and Ersan Ilyasova, Turkey. Philadelphia–a melting pot of humanity for more than 300 years—has a basketball team probably as diverse as the city itself. (AP Photo/File)MIAMI — Philadelphia’s six leading average scorers so far in the playoffs, in order are: Ben Simmons, Dario Saric, Joel Embiid, JJ Redick, Marco Belinelli and Ersan Ilyasova.Their homelands: Australia, Croatia, Cameroon, the United States, Italy and Turkey.ADVERTISEMENT Truck driver killed in Davao del Sur road accidentlast_img

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