贵族宝贝,上海贵族宝贝,上海龙凤论坛 - Powered by October, 2019

first_imgBritish tennis ace and WWF global ambassador Andy Murray has teamed up with actor and tennis fan Kevin Spacey to inspire the world to get behind an ambitious plan to double the number of tigers in the wild by the year 2022.Video: Andy Murray and Kevin Spacey Serve Up Global Tiger Challenge at Wimbledon 2016Heading into the tennis championship — Wimbledon 2016 — Murray is joined by Spacey on the All England Club’s Centre Court to champion the plight of tigers and inspire millions to get involved in a global campaign to protect them.“It’s shocking to think that there are fewer than 4,000 tigers left in the wild,” Spacey said. “That’s less than a third of the number of seats at Centre Court. But whilst their situation is precarious, I have learnt from Andy that there is hope. We really can help tiger numbers recover. It’s a challenge that I’m proud to be part of drawing attention to.”This year could be pivotal for tiger conservation: after a century of decline, global tiger numbers are on the rise. At least 3,890 tigers remain in the wild, but much more work is needed to protect this species that’s still vulnerable to extinction. WWF is working to help double the number of wild tigers by 2022 in the most ambitious tiger conservation goal ever set.last_img read more

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first_imgÀ propos de Corus MédiaCorus Média exploite au Québec les marques de télévision spécialisée francophone Historia, Séries+, Télétoon et La chaîne Disney. Corus Média est une filiale de Corus Entertainment (TSX: CRJ.B), une compagnie leader de médias et de contenus qui diffuse et distribue des marques et des contenus de haute qualité sur une variété de plateformes pour des publics à travers le monde. Son portefeuille de services multimédias englobe 45 chaînes de télévision spécialisée, 39 stations de radio, 15 stations de télévision conventionnelle, la distribution internationale, des propriétés numériques, des événements, l’édition de livre pour enfants, des logiciels d’animation et des services de technologies et médias. Les marques de choix de Corus incluent entre autres Global Television, W Network, OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network Canada, HGTV Canada, Food Network Canada, HISTORY®, Showcase, National Geographic, Q107, CKNW, Fresh Radio, Disney Channel Canada, YTV et Nickelodeon Canada. Visitez Corus au www.corusent.com. Facebook Advertisement Montréal – Dès le 26 avril sur Historia, Chopper Québec vous ouvre les portes de l’atelier Speed Trix, à Saint-André-d’Argenteuil, afin de vous donner un accès privilégié à l’univers captivant des motos modifiées et de vous faire vivre la passion des mordus de choppers.Un mode de vieLes propriétaires de Speed Trix créent de véritables œuvres d’art pour une clientèle exigeante. Mike est l’artiste qui sculpte les formes, Steve est l’expert en mécanique et Mélanie fait rouler la place. Ces trois adeptes ne comptent pas les heures passées à travailler, fignoler, modifier, chercher des pièces… Ils s’entourent aussi des meilleurs artistes, notamment du peintre de renommée mondiale Fitto, gagnant de nombreux prix prestigieux. Pour ces passionnés, la moto, ce n’est rien de moins qu’un mode de vie!Produite par Groupe Fair-Play Inc et réalisée par Sylvain Roy, l’émission Chopper Québec compte 10 épisodes de 30 minutes et sera diffusée à coups de deux épisodes consécutifs, le jeudi à 19 h et à 19 h 30, dès le 26 avril sur Historia. Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitterlast_img read more

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first_imgAPTN National NewsOTTAWA-Justice Minister Rob Nicholson said he would “consider” appointing Aboriginal judges to a special tribunal created to decide on First Nations land and compensation claims.The terms of three judges appointed to the Specific Claims Tribunal expired last month and First Nations leaders have been pushing for more say over who gets named.The government has been criticized for appointing an Ontario judge to the tribunal who sentenced six members of a northern Ontario First Nation to six months in jail for blocking an exploration company from entering their territory.Assembly of First Nations national Chief Shawn Atleo asked Nicholson in a recent letter to appoint Aboriginal judges to the tribunal and to consult with First Nations leaders before making a final decision.Nicholson said Thursday he would take Atleo’s advice seriously.“I appreciate any advice that (Atleo) gives us in this area and I think it is entirely appropriate,” said Nicholson. “I always consider any advice that I get from Chief Atleo and the AFN.”The tribunal was announced by Prime Minister Stephen Harper on June 12, 2007.It was created to cut into the backlog of specific claims. It has been mandated to handle claims of $150 million or less.Specific claims usually stem from historic grievances such as the federal government selling never-surrendered reserve lands, the mishandling of First Nations band money held in trust or the destruction of land as a result of projects like hydro dams.The tribunal has also faced controversy over the length of time it has taken to begin processing claims. A senior Indian Affairs official told a Senate committee last week he had no idea when the tribunal would be able to accept its first claim.In an interview with APTN National News, tribunal chair Justice Harry Slade said the tribunal was expected to be up and running by the end of March 2011.Slade, a B.C. Superior Court judge, said things were delayed because the judges were only appointed last year and needed to iron-out certain issues, including the need to ensure the independence of the tribunal.“There were a number of matters that we had to address and we have,” said Slade. “I am satisfied now, for the most part, that our most significant independence concerns have been dealt with.”Slade also said he understood the concerns over Ontario Superior Court Justice Patrick Smith’s six month sentence of the chief of Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug First Nation, four band councillors and one member from the community.The group,known as the KI6, were convicted for contempt of court after they refused to allow an exploration company onto their territory.Slade said Smith did the best he could under the circumstances after the group said they preferred jail sentences instead of fines.“Justice Smith was left, it would seem, with little alternative, but to impose the sentence he did,” said Slade.A higher court overturned the sentenced deeming it “too harsh.”Justice Johanne Mainville, from the Quebec Superior court, was also appointed to the tribunal.last_img read more

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first_img(Idle No More rally in Halifax Monday morning. APTN/Photo)APTN National NewsA Manitoba First Nation issued a stop work order to a mining company Monday, while in Ottawa First Nations issues burst onto the floor of the House of Commons on a day that again saw Idle No More rallies unfold around across the continent.Cree NDP MP Romeo Saganash also introduced a private members bill to make federal laws compatible with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.Idle No More called for an international day of action Monday and rallies were held from Halifax to Vancouver and in various locations across the U.S.In Snow Lake, Man., Mathias Colomb Cree Nation Chief Arlen Dumas issued a stop work other to HudBay Minerals and the Manitoba government.Dumas, along with Manitoba regional Chief Bill Traverse and Indigenous rights activist Pam Palmater, were on site during the day to deliver the edict.The mining company has applied for a Class 2 Environment Act license to construct and operate the Lalor Mine.Dumas said the site is on the territory of the Missinippi Nehethowak, which is represented by the Mathias Colomb band.“As you know, the Lalor Mine is within our traditional territories not ceded by any treaty,” wrote Dumas in a letter delivered to the company and the provincial government. “I strongly advise that a representative of the province of Manitoba and HudBay meet with us on an urgent basis to discuss this matter. In the interim, we have issued a stop work order directed at HudBay under the sovereign laws, jurisdiction and authority of Missinippi Nehethowak.”HudBay could not be reached for comment.According to the company’s website, HudBay has been mining zinc, copper, gold and silver in the Snow Lake, which sits about 215 km east of Flin Flon, Man., since 1958. The company says it has a 985-metre underground production shaft at Lalor slated for completion by 2014.FIRST NATIONS ISSUES HIT THE HOUSE OF COMMONSAnd while the drama unfolded in Snow Lake, thousands of kilometres away in Ottawa, a different kind of battle unfolded on the floor of the House of Commons during question period.While about 400 people rallied and round danced on the snow-covered lawn of Parliament Hill, inside NDP leader Thomas Mulcair and Liberal interim leader Bob Rae aimed question period salvos at Prime Minister Stephen Harper demanding that his government take the nation-to-nation relationship seriously and commit to real consultations.“Gutting environmental projection for thousands of lakes on Aboriginal territories is not meaningful consultation, cancelling thousands of environmental assessments over the objections of First Nations is not meaningful consultation,” said Mulcair. “The prime minister promised respect on a nation to nation basis. Will the prime minister finally agree to consult and to listen on the environmental protection on First Nations lands and waters?”Harper responded saying his government does respect its duty to consult along with Aboriginal and treaty rights.“We have made unprecedented investment into things that will make a concrete difference in the lives of people, in skilled training, in housing on reserves, in potable water, in schools, in treaty rights, in protection of the rights of women,” said Harper.Rae also challenged Harper to reveal what he planned to do to change the deteriorating relationship with First Nations people.“Can the prime minister tell us what further action is he going to take and what change he is going to introduce that will in fact end the sense that the Aboriginal population of Canada is being marginalized by the policies of the government of Canada?” said Rae.Harper countered, saying Aboriginal people had a stronger voice in government than ever before.“I notice that Aboriginal people have never been as strongly represented in the government of Canada as they are in this caucus today and we intend to move forward,” said Harper.Harper’s cabinet includes Health Minister Leona Aglukkaq, who is an Inuk from Nunavut, Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Peter Penashue, who is Innu from Labrador and the Conservative caucus includes Aboriginal MPs  Rob Clarke, Shelly Glover and Rod Bruinooge. Harper also appointed Algonquin Patrick Brazeau to the senate.SAGANASH INTRODUCES PRIVATE MEMBERS BILLEarlier in the day, Saganash introduced a private members bill to ensure all future government legislation would comply with the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People which contains about 46 provisions on consultation.Referring to the Idle No More movement, Saganash said First Nations people were tired of the status quo and it was time for the Canadian government to help fashion a new relationship.“As Idle No More protests grow throughout the country, it is time for the Stephen Harper government to take action and build more respectful relations with members of Canada’s First Nations, Inuit and Metis,” said Saganash, during a press conference Monday morning. “They are tired of the current status quo which leaves them in difficult living conditions, below the standards we expect in a rich country like ours.”The Idle No More movement was initially sparked by Conservative government’s omnibus Bill C-45 and Bill C-38, which streamlined environmental reviews, withdrew the majority of waterways from federal protection and amended the Indian Act.Both bills have been passed into law.First Nations leaders have said the government did not consult with them as required under the Constitution on laws that impact Aboriginal and treaty rights.IDLE NO MORE RALLIES ACROSS CONTINENTDuring the Idle No More rally in Ottawa, Serpent River First Nation Chief Isadore Day told about 400 people that the game had changed.“Prime Minister, this is just the beginning…we are going to remain idle no more,” said Day. “Times are changing, we are idle no more.”And with drums pounding and singing rising against a steady snowfall a round dance unfurled in the shadow of the Peace Tower.Idle No More also stirred on the East Coast in Halifax as about 200 people drummed and marched across one of two main bridges through the city. The rally also launched a large round dance, which has been the staple of the movement, in the Halifax Commons, a large park in the middle of the city.From Toronto to Vancouver and in the United States, Idle No More flexed its muscles once again in a reminder that the movement was far from fading away.Watch APTN National News Monday evening for full coverage of the day’s events.last_img read more

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first_imgAPTN National NewsA group of Whitehorse citizens aren’t taking any chances.They say a convicted child molester is dating a woman who has a three-year-old child.They know this because the woman posted a photo of the man on her Facebook page to announce their new relationship.The courts say he has a high risk to reoffend and some people are letting everyone know.APTN’s Shirley McLean has the story.last_img

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first_imgDanielle RochetteAPTN NewsManawan Chief Jean-Rock Ottawa proudly displays a small medallion of Saky-Anne Petiquay, who drowned in September 2016.The eight-year-old girl may still be alive if the community had an ambulance according to Ottawa.“If there had been the presence of the paramedics, this girl would have had the same chances of survival if we had the resources in the community,” Ottawa testified Monday at the Quebec inquiry into the province’s treatment of Indigenous people.The community has been fighting to get those services for over 20 years.Manawan, with its 2,500 members, is only accessible by a logging road and is located 80 kilometres north of Saint-Michel des Saints.For Ottawa it’s simple – Manawan is a victim of discrimination.“The Atikamekw in Manawan are clearly discriminated against by Québec government authorities, particularly with regard to pre-hospital emergency services,” he said. “The Atikamekw Council of Manawan is convinced that now the discriminatory situation of the ambulance service for the members of our community results in an inequality that can be qualified as systemic racism.”drochette@aptn.calast_img read more

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first_imgAngel MooreAPTN NewsEmma Ward-Levi just wanted a book to read. The 10-year old Mi’kmaw girl was not expecting to find a book with the line, “I am an Indian and I will scalp you.”She knew those words were wrong, but she didn’t know what to do, so she took the book home to show her mother.Sharona Lynn Levi could not believe what her daughter had discovered at school.“I asked Emma if she understood what scalping meant. I know what it means, and I know it is used as a derogatory term.” she said.Lynn Levi contacted the school and soon people reached out from the Anglophone North School District, the New Brunswick Department of Education, and the Minister of Education.“They apologized and immediately want to find answers like you and me,” she said. “They want to know how the book slipped through and made it into the classroom.” Dominique Cardy, the Minister of Education said in a statement that the district is removing any copies and checking for any other books for inappropriate content.“Immediately upon learning of this situation the district decided to remove any copies of this book from its libraries. We asked all school districts to review any other books by this author to check for other inappropriate content.“I have spoken with Aboriginal Affairs Minister Jake Stewart who stressed the importance of ensuring such racist materials are not available in our schools. I called Chief Aaron Sock of Elsipogtog First Nation and the mother of the child who brought the book home to apologize and to explain the steps the department and the school district are taking.”“The material in this book is racist. We regret it being present in our public-school libraries,” said the statement.(Emma Ward Levi informed her mother of the book she found in the library that reference scalping)Lynn Levi wanted to know how long the book has been on the classroom shelf, and how many children have read it.The School District posted on their website a statement a zero tolerance for racism.“Racist literature is unacceptable, and the book has been removed,” said the statement.Lynn Levi said her daughter knows what is right and wrong.“I am very proud of Emma, she is not afraid to speak up. And she is ready to go back to class and talk about it,” she said.“I am happy this happened because it tells us we are not where we think we are, so we need to figure this out, there needs to be accountability so we can change it.”amoore@aptn.ca@angelharksenlast_img read more

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first_imgCALGARY – TransCanada Corp (TSX:TRP) says it plans to restart operations on its Keystone pipeline on Nov. 28 after making repairs to a leak that spilled about 795,000 litres of crude oil in South Dakota.The company says U.S. regulators have cleared its restart plans, which include restarting the pipeline at a reduced pressure before gradually increasing the volume of crude oil in the system.TransCanada says that as of Nov. 24, it had recovered about 168,000 litres of crude oil from the spill in a farmer’s field, and that there are no indications of the spill affecting water sources.The spill on Nov. 16 forced the company to shut the section of the Keystone pipeline system between Hardisty, Alta., and Cushing Okla. and a spur line to Patoka, Ill., while a southern section extending to the Gulf Coast remained in operation.The leak increased scrutiny of the company’s pipeline operations just days before Nebraska regulators voted on whether to allow the company’s proposed Keystone XL pipeline project to run through the state.Regulators gave the go-ahead for the project on Nov. 20, but approved an alternative route to the one preferred by TransCanada.last_img read more

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first_imgDUBAI, United Arab Emirates – The United Arab Emirates claimed Qatari fighter jets intercepted two of its commercial airliners in international airspace on the way to Bahrain, allegations denied by Qatar.The claims Monday could further escalate tensions between Qatar and the four Arab nations that have been boycotting it for months, among them the UAE, home to the world’s busiest international airport. They also could affect long-haul airline travel, as the region’s carriers are a crucial link between the East and West.It follows two complaints by Qatar to the United Nations about Emirati military aircraft allegedly violating its international airspace amid the diplomatic crisis. The UAE denies the allegations.The UAE’s state-run WAM news agency made the claim about the Qatari jet fighters on Monday, citing the country’s General Civil Aviation Authority.WAM quoted Saif al-Suwaidi, the director-general of the GCAA, as saying the intercepts happened at 10:30 a.m. and 11:05 a.m. He said Bahraini radar, as well as crew and passengers on board, saw the military aircraft, “which constituted a clear and explicit threat to the lives of innocent civilians.”WAM did not identify the aircraft involved, nor did it elaborate on details of the purported encounters. The GCAA did not immediately respond to questions from The Associated Press.Bahrain’s state-run BNA news agency, citing its own civil aviation authority, identified the two flights as Dubai-based Emirates flight No. EK837, a Boeing 777, and another flown by Abu Dhabi-based Etihad. The flight number it offered for Etihad did not correspond with any scheduled flight to Bahrain.“Qatari military fighter jets came within two miles of the Emirates aircraft, which put the lives of passengers and crew at risk,” BNA said. It offered few details about the Etihad flight.Both airlines declined to comment when reached by the AP.Qatar’s Foreign Ministry called the UAE’s allegations a “totally false claim” in a statement Monday night. “It seems that the UAE is trying to draw attention away from other incidents that have caused media crises,” it said.That appeared to reference a video released Sunday night of an exiled Qatari ruling family member, once promoted by Saudi Arabia as an alternative to the country’s ruling emir, claiming he’s being held against his will in the UAE, an allegation denied by Abu Dhabi.The video of Sheikh Abdullah bin Ali Al Thani recalled the bizarre, now-reversed resignation of Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri while on a trip to Saudi Arabia, a Nov. 4 decision that was widely seen as orchestrated by Riyadh.Emirates flight No. EK837 was scheduled to depart Dubai at 8:20 a.m. Monday, but pushed off nearly an hour late. It flew out over international waters near the northern tip of Qatar, a peninsular nation that juts into the Persian Gulf, before arriving in the island nation of Bahrain 46 minutes after takeoff. That’s been the standard route of all Emirati commercial airliners since the crisis began.FlightRadar24, a plane-tracking website, did not show any unusual routes between the UAE and Bahrain. “There appears to be no deviation from standard routing and approach patterns in today’s flights,” FlightRadar24 spokesman Ian Petchenik told the AP.U.S. Air Force Central Command, which is based at the sprawling al-Udeid Air Base in Qatar, did not have any reports of incidents involving commercial aircraft in the region, said Lt. Col. Damien Pickart, an Air Force spokesman. However, Pickart cautioned that U.S. forces don’t routinely monitor the flights and operations of the Qatari air force.Qatar’s stock exchange dropped some 2.5 per cent in trading Monday, one of its biggest jolts since the crisis began.Bahrain, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the UAE cut off Qatar’s land, sea and air routes on June 5 over its alleged support of extremists and close ties with Iran.Qatar has long denied funding extremists. It recently restored full diplomatic relations with Iran, with which it shares a massive offshore natural gas field that makes the country and its 250,000 citizens extremely wealthy.The crisis has hurt Qatar Airways, Doha’s long-haul carrier that competes with Emirates and Etihad.Qatar had complained to the Montreal-based International Civil Aviation Organization about the boycotting nations cutting off its air routes, forcing the carrier to take longer flights through Iran and Turkey. Its regional feeder flights in Saudi Arabia and the UAE also have been cut off.However, widening the Gulf dispute to include civilian aviation and airspace could hurt Emirati airlines already stung by President Donald Trump’s travel bans, as well as last year’s since-lifted ban on laptops in airplane cabins.The White House said Trump spoke Monday with Qatar’s ruling emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, saying the president reiterated his support for unity among Gulf Arab nations. Trump also thanked Sheikh Tamim for Qatar’s “action to counter terrorism and extremism,” the White House said.Qatar earlier accused Emirati military jets of violating its air space in December and January in two incidents, filing a complaint to the United Nations. Anwar Gargash, the Emirati minister of state for foreign affairs, wrote Friday on Twitter that Qatar’s airspace complaints were “incorrect and confused,” without elaborating.Sheikh Tamim also travelled Monday to Ankara to meet with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Turkish officials said Erdogan and Al Thani discussed bilateral ties and regional issues, without offering specifics. Turkey has a military base in Qatar and has supported Doha in the diplomatic dispute.___Associated Press writer Suzan Fraser in Ankara, Turkey, contributed to this report.___Follow Jon Gambrell on Twitter at www.twitter.com/jongambrellap . His work can be found at http://apne.ws/2galNpz .last_img read more

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first_imgOTTAWA – The official Opposition is pointing to India’s decision to raise tariffs on chickpeas as the latest evidence that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s recent trip to that country ended up doing more harm than good.Conservative MP Candice Bergen led off question period Friday by citing India’s higher tariffs — now 60 per cent, up from 40 — as proof that Trudeau’s troubled trip overseas and the ensuing controversy have resulted a breakdown in relations.“Last night India raised the duty on chickpeas to 60 per cent — a clear signal that India is understandably upset and Canadian chickpea producers are the first to pay the price,” Bergen said.Trudeau has been embroiled in controversy since news broke that Jaspal Atwal — a B.C. Sikh convicted of trying to kill an Indian cabinet minister in 1986 — was included on the guest list for a pair of high-level receptions in India, and even attended one where he was photographed with Trudeau’s wife.A media briefing during the trip by national security adviser Daniel Jean suggested Atwal’s presence during Trudeau’s trip was arranged by factions within the Indian government who want to prevent Prime Minister Narendra Modi from getting too cosy with a foreign government they believe is not committed to a united India.India provides significant growth potential for trade with Canada, said Bergen, but the governing Liberals are threatening those relations by suggesting India itself helped to orchestrate what turned out to be an embarrassing gaffe.“When the prime minister is blaming India for causing problems with his trip, the prime minister is damaging all of the work that everybody in this place is trying to do for Canadians,” Bergen said. “His conspiracy theory against India is causing a breakdown in our relationship.”Trudeau, speaking in Barrie, Ont., said the tariff increase doesn’t specifically target Canada, and that he had productive discussions with Modi on increasing the predictability of future tariffs as well as on pest treatment issues with shipments to India.“Last week I had excellent conversations with Prime Minister Modi about science-based approaches to fumigation issues that were related to our pulses here, where we agreed to settle the science and bring forth science-based solutions within the next year, and bring about better predictability on what tariff barriers could be.”The latest increase in chickpea tariffs comes after India imposed a 50 per cent tariff on pea imports last November and a 30 per cent tariff on chickpeas and lentils in December that were then raised to 40 per cent in February.The increases are part of the Indian government’s push to boost domestic production of the crops, and protect farmers from cheaper international production, said Pulse Canada CEO Gordon Bacon.“They’ve made it clear they want to become self-sufficient for pulse production.”He said Canadian chickpea exports to India have averaged around $5 million over the past five years, compared with more than $500 million for both peas and lentils, making chickpeas an odd choice if India were truly trying to punish Canada.“If it is punishment, it is a small metering out of punishment relative to what could have happened if they would have applied it to lentils.”India’s tariffs on peas are already at the maximum allowed by trade agreements, but the country could raise chickpea and lentil tariffs to 100 per cent, he added.last_img read more

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first_imgSHANGHAI – British Airways, Lufthansa and Air Canada are among 20 carriers that now refer to Taiwan, the self-ruled island that Beijing considers its territory, as a part of China on their global websites, in line with Beijing’s demands that the White House called “Orwellian nonsense,” The Associated Press has found.There are just three days left for dozens of foreign airlines to decide whether to comply with Beijing’s orders or face consequences that could cripple their China business, including legal sanctions. Many have already sided with Beijing.The spread of “Taiwan, China” on the drop-down menus and maps of airline websites represents another victory for China’s President Xi Jinping and his ruling Communist Party’s nationalistic effort to force foreign companies to conform to their geopolitical vision, even in operations outside of China. Critics say China’s incremental push to leverage its economic power to forge new international norms — in this case regarding Taiwan’s status — creates worrying precedents.Beyond fiery missives there is little Washington can do to unify a fractured global response and effectively push back against Beijing’s demands.“What’s at stake is that we’re allowing a revisionist regime with a terrible track record on freedom of speech to dictate what we say and write in our own countries,” said J. Michael Cole, a Taipei-based senior fellow with the China Policy Institute and the University of Nottingham’s Taiwan studies program. “If Beijing does not encounter red lines, it can only keep asking for more.”For Beijing, there is only one China and Taiwan, which has been a democracy since the 1990s, is part of it. The People’s Republic of China and Taiwan separated during a civil war in 1949. Washington officially recognizes Beijing rather than Taipei, but despite the lack of formal ties, the U.S. is legally bound to respond to threats to Taiwan and is the island’s main supplier of foreign military hardware.z“We strongly object to China’s efforts to bully, coerce, and threaten their way to achieving their political objectives,” Taiwan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs said in a statement to the AP. “We call on all countries around the world to stand together to uphold the freedom of speech and freedom to do business. We also call on private firms to collectively reject China’s unreasonable demands to change their designation of ‘Taiwan’ to ‘Taiwan, China.’”Xi has warned a Taiwanese envoy that the issue of unification cannot be put off indefinitely, and the People’s Liberation Army has sent fighter planes near Taiwan’s coast. As China steps up efforts to isolate Taiwan diplomatically, the list of multinationals that have bent to Beijing’s will is long — and growing.U.S. clothing retailer The Gap apologized this month for selling T-shirts with a map of China that omitted Taiwan and pulled the offending merchandise from stores around the world. In January, Delta Airlines, Marriott, Zara and medical equipment maker Medtronic all publicly apologized for referring to Taiwan as a country.“You can’t just say ‘no,’” said Carly Ramsey, a regulatory risk specialist at Control Risks, a consultancy in Shanghai. “Increasingly, for situations like this, non-compliance is not an option if you want to do business in and with China.”The day after Delta apologized for “emotional damage caused to the Chinese people,” the Civil Aviation Administration of China published a notice on its website saying it requires foreign airlines operating in China to avoid referring to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau as countries.Some foreign carriers began changing drop-down menus on their websites from “country” to “country/region.”But Beijing wanted more.On April 25, the Civil Aviation Administration of China sent a letter to 36 foreign airlines ordering them to explicitly refer to Taiwan as a part of China. The regulator did not respond to requests for comment.In a strongly-worded statement 10 days later, the White House called that demand “Orwellian nonsense.”“China’s efforts to export its censorship and political correctness to Americans and the rest of the free world will be resisted,” it said.China’s Foreign Ministry hit back the next day, saying Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau are “inalienable” parts of China’s territory and foreign companies operating in China “should respect China’s sovereignty and territorial integrity, abide by China’s laws and respect the national sentiment of the Chinese people.”A bipartisan group of U.S. senators, led by Marco Rubio, a Florida Republican, and Bob Menendez, a New Jersey Democrat, offered the airlines support.“As you weigh your response options, you should know that your government stands with you, and will strongly oppose attempts by China or any other foreign government to unilaterally dictate terms to an American company and exert sovereignty over your internal business practices and the content of your website,” the group of eight lawmakers said in a letter dated last week.But a growing number of airlines have heeded Beijing’s call.The AP found that Air Canada, Lufthansa, British Airways, Finnair, Garuda Indonesia, Asiana Airlines, and Philippine Airlines all have changed the way they refer to Taiwan to bring their global websites in line with the Chinese Communist Party’s vision.SAS airlines, Swissair, Malaysia Airlines, Cebu Pacific Air, Aeroflot, Alitalia, Austrian Airlines, Air Mauritius, Etihad Airways, Spain’s Iberia, Israel’s El Al, MIAT Mongolian Airlines and Russia’s S7 Airlines all also refer to Taiwan as part of China, but it was not immediately clear how long they had been using that formulation.Lufthansa, British Airways, Air Canada and Finnair said they abide by laws and regulations internationally and in the jurisdictions in which they work.“This includes taking customs of the international clientele into consideration,” Lufthansa said in a statement, adding that we “seek your understanding for the situation.”Finnair said a decision was taken to amend the website earlier this year and “in line with the general view taken in Europe, Taiwan is not shown as an independent country in our list of destinations.”Major U.S. carriers have not yet caved. United Airlines, American Airlines, Delta and Hawaiian Airlines, as well as Australia’s Qantas Airways — all of which received April letters from the regulator — did not refer to Taiwan as part of China on their websites as of Tuesday.The airlines told AP they were reviewing the request.But the sweep of concessions will likely make it harder to resist Beijing’s call.“If they make individual corporate decisions, they will likely accede, individually but entirely, to Chinese demands,” said Robert Daly, the director of the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. What Washington could do, he added, is “launch and sustain a global discussion of the implications of Beijing’s insistence on the worldwide jurisdiction of Chinese law. That kind of effort would require a commitment to global leadership and strong alliances that this administration has not yet demonstrated.”In one apparent exception to Beijing’s rules the national flag carrier Air China seems not to have gotten the regulator’s memo. On its US site, Taipei is a part of “Taiwan, China.” But its Taiwan website lists it as “Taipei, Taiwan.”Air China did not immediately respond to requests for comment.__Associated Press researchers Si Chen and Fu Ting in Shanghai contributed to this report.___Follow Kinetz on Twitter at www.twitter.com/ekinetzlast_img read more

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first_imgBell Canada acknowledged Friday that it needs to improve when selling its television, internet and wireless services but insisted that the percentage of problems it experiences is small and doesn’t reflect its own code of conduct.Rob Malcolmson, who led a Bell delegation to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, said the company has a stringent code of conduct for employees and contractors.But the senior vice-president of regulatory affairs for Bell’s parent BCE Inc. acknowledged that “more can be done to strengthen the confidence and trust Canadian consumers have in our industry.”The Montreal-based company — which operates the Virgin Mobile and Lucky wireless brands in addition to various Bell services — was named in 346 of about 1,300 complaints filed as part of the CRTC’s inquiry.“We did a deeper dive on those, and 201 fell into the category ‘price not as expected’ . . . and 78 fell into the category of potentially aggressive sales tactics,” Malcolmson said.“So we looked at those and we said, that seems to be the core issue and asked: How do we fix it?”Bell’s proposed solution is to have several measures required of the industry as a whole — including allowing a customer to terminate a new service within 30 days of installation, without an early termination fee.Bell also says all service should provide order confirmations, written in plain language, within 24 hours of an order being placed.Rizwan Jamal, president of Bell Residential Services, said that if customers don’t agree after reviewing the written material “they can walk away with no termination penalties.”Several advocacy groups for consumers, seniors, ethnic groups and people with disabilities have proposed numerous ways to impose new rules or standards on the telecommunications industry.But many of the companies that sell the products insisted during a week of proceedings that industry-wide rules and regulations aren’t necessary.The delegation from Rogers Communications — which offers Rogers, Fido and Chatr wireless services in addition to its Rogers branded television and internet services for the home — said Friday it doesn’t think a CRTC code of sales practices is necessary but it would want to be involved with its creation if that’s the outcome of the hearing process.“We don’t believe there’s a systemic issue,” said Eric Agius, the company’s senior vice-president of customer care, said in an interview after addressing the commission.“For us, what’s most important is that we build long-term relationships with our customers.”Rogers is tackling the issue of customer complaints by continuously improving its sales processes — including the introduction of a new pause in transactions that will give sales people time to clearly explain all elements of the deal.A limited number of Rogers retail outlets have already introduced a system for summarizing all the key elements of a quote, and the company aims to do the same across all its sales channels by the end of 2019 — including door-to-door..Earlier, Shaw Communications Inc. said the federal regulator can best protect Canadians from problem sales practices by banning telecom companies from using outside contractors to do their door-to-door sales.Shaw senior vice-president Paul Cowling told CRTC commissioners that door-to-door sales have resulted in the most serious problems revealed by media reports, which included investigative reports by CBC.“Focusing a recommendation or remedy on door-to-door sales would address the most significant area of risk and consumer vulnerability,” Cowling said. “We have proposed a prohibition on third-party sales.”Like its competitors, Shaw does uses door-to-door sales but they are by employees rather than outside contractors. By contrast, Rogers uses a combination of employees and outside contractors for door-to-door sales and Bell outsources all of its door-to-door sales to a third-party provider.Companies in this story: (TSX:SJR.B, TSX:RCI.B, TSX:BCE)last_img read more

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first_imgNEW YORK — A federal jury in Manhattan has convicted a Hong Kong businessman of bribing the presidents of Chad and Uganda to secure oil rights for a Chinese energy conglomerate.Dr. Chi Ping Patrick Ho was found guilty Wednesday of seven of eight counts of conspiracy, money laundering and violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.Ho’s attorneys acknowledged he made the cash payments but insisted they were donations intended to foster goodwill.Prosecutors portrayed Ho as a cheater who lined the pockets of government officials in a bid to expand the business of CEFC China Energy around the world.The case had a number of links to the United Nations and involved meetings and wire transfers in New York City.Jim Mustian, The Associated Presslast_img

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first_imgBOSTON — A pharmaceutical company has agreed to pay $360 million to resolve allegations that it used a charitable foundation to pay kickbacks to Medicare patients.The U.S. attorney’s office in Boston announced the settlement Thursday with Actelion Pharmaceuticals US Inc., which was acquired last year by health care giant Johnson & Johnson.Federal prosecutors say South San Francisco-based Actelion illegally used a purportedly independent charity to cover the co-payments of thousands of Medicare patients taking its pulmonary arterial high blood pressure drugs.Prosecutors say that helped the company convince patients to buy its drugs when the prices it set would have otherwise prevented them from doing so. The U.S. attorney’s office says that violated the anti-kickback law.A message was left with Actelion on Thursday seeking comment.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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first_imgFRANKFORT, Ky. — A Kentucky appeals court says the secret testimony from a former president of one of the world’s largest manufacturers of dangerously addictive opioid painkillers must be released to the public.A three-judge panel ruled Friday the deposition of Richard Sackler must be unsealed. Sackler is a former president of Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin. He’s a member of the family that controls the company. His testimony could reveal more information about the company’s marketing practices. The company announced earlier this year it would stop marketing the painkiller.Sackler’s testimony is part of Kentucky’s lawsuit against Purdue Pharma that settled in 2015 for $24 million.The ruling is a victory for STAT, a national health publication owned by Boston Globe Media that sued to unseal the testimony.Adam Beam, The Associated Presslast_img read more

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first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The B.C. Wildfire Service responded to seven new forest fires on Saturday that were all human-caused.The largest fire was south of Pouce Coupe and reached 10 hectares in size.  Crews from the B.C. Wildfire Service, the Pouce Coupe Volunteer Fire Department and a crew from Alberta all responded to the fire.  Two tankers were successful in containing the fire and keeping it from Highway 2.  Crews will continue to monitor the fire throughout the night and have more resources on the fire if need be on Sunday.  The Village of Pouce Coupe has not issued any evacuation orders or alerts for the area. Wonowon/Halfway RiverThis fire was started by someone burning grass.  Crews in the area have the fire under control.Gundy RoadThis fire reached four hectares in size and is now considered out.Powder KingA landowner was burning and caused this fire.  Crews are working the fire and it is currently 1.5 hectares in size.  The fire is located 15 km north of Powder King along Highway 97.Fire Information Officers Amanda Reynolds with the Prince George Fire Centre said that conditions in Northeast B.C. are starting to dry out because of the lack of rain that the rest of the Southern Interior has experienced this week. Reynolds is reminding residents that Category Two fires, fireworks, and burning barrels are currently banned in all of Northeast B.C. and that anyone present near a campfire that is larger than a half-metre in dimension would be liable to get a fine of over $1,000.The video below shows crews responding to a fire near Fort Nelson on Friday, May 11.  The fire caused over 100 properties to be evacuated for part of the day on Friday.  The fire has been contained. The Village of Pouce Coupe has banned all burning within the boundaries of the community.  The ban includes everything from large burning to campfires.  This ban only affects residents that live within the boundaries of the Village of Pouce Coupe.B.C. Wildfire Service officials are stressing residents in the Peace Region need to obey the fire ban that was implemented earlier this month for the entire region.  A category two ban is in place that covers all open burning of any material (piled or unpiled) smaller than two metres high and three metres wide.  The ban also includes burning barrels, fireworks and stubble or grass fires over an area smaller than 2,000 square metres.  At this time the ban does not include campfires.With the forecast calling for more hot and dry weather, with high winds, the B.C. Wildfire Service is ready with resources to respond to any new fires.Beaton River ValleyThis fire started on Friday but is now considered out.  The fire reached 2.5 hectares in size.center_img Baldonnel RoadThis fire has six firefighters working to contain the fire.  Local residents are also helping and crews have been able to get a good handle on the fire.  It is approximately 8 hectares.East PineThe fire is two to three hectares in size and eight firefighters are working the fire.  The winds have died down and crews have also been able to contain this fire.last_img read more

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first_imgThe board says in its written decision that Hamdan made himself out to be a cheerleader for the Islamic State in many of his 85 Facebook posts as he glorified and encouraged lone wolf attacks in Canada, the United States and other western countries.The decision says Hamdan cast his activity on Facebook as an alternative news source, providing his followers with another view of events in the Middle East as he relayed the message of a terrorist organization.Hamdan was arrested in 2015 at his home in Fort St. John, where he moved years after studying electrical engineering in the United States. VANCOUVER, B.C. – A British Columbia man has been deemed inadmissible to Canada for being a security risk based on his Facebook posts promoting terrorism in support of the Islamic State group.Othman Hamdan is a Jordanian national who was acquitted of terrorism-related charges by a B.C. Supreme Court judge in September 2017, but immigration authorities arrested him and determined at multiple detention reviews that he poses a danger to the public.Now, the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada has decided Hamdan should be deported.last_img read more

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