Man arrested for slapping stepdaughter’s 12-year-old bully, police say

first_imgEvgen_Prozhyrko/iStock(LA PORTE, Texas) — A Texas man was recently arrested for slapping a 12-year-old boy in the face. He claims the boy was was bullying his young stepdaughter, according to police.James Peace, 37, of La Porte, Texas, had just picked up his stepdaughter from school when he saw the boy walking home with a friend in Harris County last Thursday afternoon. Peace told investigators that his stepdaughter has depression and that the boy’s teasing caused her “serious psychological harm,” an officer with the Deer Park Police Department stated in the probable cause affidavit.Peace pulled over, got out of the car and began shouting at the boy for picking on his stepdaughter. He then struck the boy with an open palm on the side of his face before getting back into his car and driving away, according to the affidavit.Peace initially denied the act when questioned by police the following day, but admitted to it after he was advised that a surveillance camera from a nearby residence had captured the entire incident. Peace told police that “he let his emotions get the best of him,” according to the affidavit.Peace faces a felony charge of injury to a child.The boy told police he didn’t know the adult who slapped him but recognized his classmate sitting in the front passenger seat of the vehicle. The boy said the man told him not to tell anyone what happened or “he will beat them up too, even the police.” The boy said he didn’t immediately tell his parents or others because he “was afraid that the man may return and cause more harm to him or his family,” according to the probable cause affidavit.The boy took a photo of himself after the incident, which he later showed to police. The picture shows the boy with “an obvious large handprint on the left side of his face that was extremely red and appeared to be swelling,” according to the affidavit.The next day, the boy told his teacher about what happened after asking if he could stay in class and have lunch with her rather than go to the cafeteria with the other students, explaining that he didn’t want to see the classmate who was in the vehicle when the man slapped him. The teacher immediately notified school officials and the boy’s mother, prompting a police investigation.Peace’s stepdaughter told police she did see her stepfather slap the boy in the face but “didn’t think it was that hard of a strike.” She said the boy had been “picking on her at school and calling her names and that she told her parents about it,” which led to the confrontation, according to the probable cause affidavit.Peace’s wife, who asked to remain anonymous, told ABC Houston station KTRK that her daughter called and asked for a ride home because the boy and his friend were bullying her after school.“Saying that her body was ugly, said that she was a transvestite, started throwing ice cream at her and then they picked up the rocks,” the mother told KTRK, adding that she doesn’t agree with her husband’s actions. “He took it too far, he did.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Kogan

first_imgKogan CELEBRATING 15 YEARS as the self described “rebellious group” of the Bar, the Public Interest Law Section recently honored two legal giants with one award. PILS established the Chesterfield Smith Public Interest Law Lifetime Achievement Award, to honor the late president of both the ABA and The Florida Bar, and named former Supreme Court Justice Gerald Kogan as its first recipient. “To be compared with Chesterfield Smith is indeed an honor that I never would have expected in my lifetime,” Kogan said at the PILS luncheon in Miami. “To call Chesterfield Smith a hero, that is correct. To mention me in the same breath as Chesterfield as a fellow hero, I don’t know if I could ever live up to that particular designation.” But PILS Chair Carolyn Salisbury deemed both lawyers heroes as she focused on their philosophies about making pro bono legal work mandatory for all licensed lawyers. At the PILS luncheon in 2003, just months before his death, Smith said in his keynote address: “We, as lawyers, cannot simply work for ourselves and our deep-pocketed clients. We, as lawyers, must discharge our professional obligations always to help provide access to the legal system for all citizens.” Similarly, Salisbury quoted from Kogan’s dissent when the court did not adopt mandatory pro bono more than a decade ago: “The people most seriously affected by this court’s action today are the ones who are not present, the people who cannot afford an attorney and thus cannot afford to appear before us to argue their side of this issue. These are the people that because of the economics of our legal system have been excluded from the same level of legal services available to more affluent residents of Florida.. . . As attorneys, we are all too often seen by the public as dour and greedy. Try as we may, we will never shake this unseemly image until we have demonstrated to the public that we take our constitution seriously and that we will live up to a dictate even if it diminishes our own pocketbooks. The time has come to do just that.” Pictured from the left are Jackie Allee Smith, Smith’s widow, Kogan, and his wife, Irene. March 15, 2005 Regular Newslast_img read more

Lilly COVID-19 treatment could be authorized for use as soon as September: Chief scientist

first_imgCoronavirus vaccines being developed and tested at unprecedented speed are not likely to be ready before the end of the year at the earliest.Earlier this month, Lilly announced it had initiated patient testing for two separate antibody treatments. One currently designated LY-CoV555 is being developed in partnership with Canadian biotech AbCellera. The other, JS016, it being developed with Chinese drugmaker Shanghai Junshi Biosciences.Both work by blocking part of the virus’ so-called spike protein that it uses to enter human cells and replicate.Lilly’s third antibody treatment candidate acts on a different part of the virus and will most likely be tested in combination with one or both of the others, Skovronsky said.The drugmaker, however, said it has a strong preference to develop a treatment that can work well in COVID-19 patients as a stand alone, as manufacturing these type of drugs, which are typically administered by infusion, is a complex process and capacity is limited.”It’s good to have two antibodies. The downside is that manufacturing is precious. We have limited manufacturing capacity. If two antibodies are required, half as many people will get treated,” Skovronsky said. “So our goal is to see if we can do one antibody at as low a dose as possible.”Lilly will have the capacity to make hundreds of thousands of doses by the end of the year if it can treat COVID-19 patients using a single antibody drug rather than with a combination, he said.Preventing the disease with these type of drugs presents a different manufacturing challenge entirely.”Global capacity for antibodies is just not high enough that we could ever think about adequate doses” for “billions of people in the prophylactic setting,” Skovronsky said.The better solution is to widely inoculate people with COVID-19 vaccines when available, and reserve antibody treatments for people who have the disease or were recently exposed to it.They could also help vulnerable populations where vaccines are less effective, such as nursing home patients, he said.Lilly hopes to conduct a COVID-19 prevention clinical trial in nursing home patients later this year, he added.The Indianapolis-based drugmaker plans to produce the medicines in plants in Kinsale, Ireland and New Jersey, and is willing to use its capacity to help manufacture another company’s successful treatment, should Lilly’s fail in clinical trails.Lilly is continuing to screen for antibodies through its partnership with AbCellera, which is working with the US National Institutes of Health to identify promising compounds, Skovronsky said.  Eli Lilly and Co could have a drug specifically designed to treat COVID-19 authorized for use as early as September if all goes well with either of two antibody therapies it is testing, its chief scientist told Reuters on Wednesday.Lilly is also doing preclinical studies of a third antibody treatment for the illness caused by the new coronavirus that could enter human clinical trials in the coming weeks, Chief Scientific Officer Daniel Skovronsky said in an interview.Lilly has already launched human trials with two of the experimental therapies. Topics :center_img The drugs belong to a class of biotech medicines called monoclonal antibodies widely used to treat cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and many other conditions. A monoclonal antibody drug developed against COVID-19 is likely to be more effective than repurposed medicines currently being tested against the virus.Skovronsky said the therapies – which may also be used to prevent the disease – could beat a vaccine to widespread use as a COVID-19 treatment, if they prove effective.”For the treatment indication, particularly, this could go pretty fast,” he said in an interview. “If in August or September we’re seeing the people who got treated are not progressing to hospitalization, that would be powerful data and could lead to emergency use authorization.””So that puts you in the fall time: September, October, November is not unreasonable,” he said.last_img read more

Leicester go for Liverpool Bosman prospect Lallana

first_img Promoted Content5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More8 Things To Expect If An Asteroid Hits Our Planet11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table Top7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty PennyBest Car Manufacturers In The World”Chronicles Of Narnia” Fans Were Bemused To See How She Looks Now7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?10 Phones That Can Easily Fit In The Smallest PocketInsane 3D Spraying Skills Turn In Incredible Street Art5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks Loading… Leicester City are moving for Liverpool’s Bosman prospect, Adam Lallana. The Liverpool midfielder, who signed for the Reds from Southampton in 2014, is out-of-contract this summer and is highly unlikely to sign a new deal at Anfield. Sky Sports says as a result, he is already allowed to talk to foreign clubs about a summer move but Leicester, managed by Brendan Rodgers, have looked to steal a march on other Premier League clubs by making an enquiry.Advertisement The report details that Lallana would need Liverpool’s permission to talk to other English clubs before his current contract expires in June, but the Reds have allowed the midfielder to plan his future. Read Also:Ricardo: Leicester City are gradually improving Arsenal, Tottenham and West Ham are other Premier League clubs reportedly keeping an eye on Lallana’s situation ahead of the summer window. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more