Akeler pre-lets Lisbon campus

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Lilly COVID-19 treatment could be authorized for use as soon as September: Chief scientist

first_imgCoronavirus vaccines being developed and tested at unprecedented speed are not likely to be ready before the end of the year at the earliest.Earlier this month, Lilly announced it had initiated patient testing for two separate antibody treatments. One currently designated LY-CoV555 is being developed in partnership with Canadian biotech AbCellera. The other, JS016, it being developed with Chinese drugmaker Shanghai Junshi Biosciences.Both work by blocking part of the virus’ so-called spike protein that it uses to enter human cells and replicate.Lilly’s third antibody treatment candidate acts on a different part of the virus and will most likely be tested in combination with one or both of the others, Skovronsky said.The drugmaker, however, said it has a strong preference to develop a treatment that can work well in COVID-19 patients as a stand alone, as manufacturing these type of drugs, which are typically administered by infusion, is a complex process and capacity is limited.”It’s good to have two antibodies. The downside is that manufacturing is precious. We have limited manufacturing capacity. If two antibodies are required, half as many people will get treated,” Skovronsky said. “So our goal is to see if we can do one antibody at as low a dose as possible.”Lilly will have the capacity to make hundreds of thousands of doses by the end of the year if it can treat COVID-19 patients using a single antibody drug rather than with a combination, he said.Preventing the disease with these type of drugs presents a different manufacturing challenge entirely.”Global capacity for antibodies is just not high enough that we could ever think about adequate doses” for “billions of people in the prophylactic setting,” Skovronsky said.The better solution is to widely inoculate people with COVID-19 vaccines when available, and reserve antibody treatments for people who have the disease or were recently exposed to it.They could also help vulnerable populations where vaccines are less effective, such as nursing home patients, he said.Lilly hopes to conduct a COVID-19 prevention clinical trial in nursing home patients later this year, he added.The Indianapolis-based drugmaker plans to produce the medicines in plants in Kinsale, Ireland and New Jersey, and is willing to use its capacity to help manufacture another company’s successful treatment, should Lilly’s fail in clinical trails.Lilly is continuing to screen for antibodies through its partnership with AbCellera, which is working with the US National Institutes of Health to identify promising compounds, Skovronsky said.  Eli Lilly and Co could have a drug specifically designed to treat COVID-19 authorized for use as early as September if all goes well with either of two antibody therapies it is testing, its chief scientist told Reuters on Wednesday.Lilly is also doing preclinical studies of a third antibody treatment for the illness caused by the new coronavirus that could enter human clinical trials in the coming weeks, Chief Scientific Officer Daniel Skovronsky said in an interview.Lilly has already launched human trials with two of the experimental therapies. Topics :center_img The drugs belong to a class of biotech medicines called monoclonal antibodies widely used to treat cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and many other conditions. A monoclonal antibody drug developed against COVID-19 is likely to be more effective than repurposed medicines currently being tested against the virus.Skovronsky said the therapies – which may also be used to prevent the disease – could beat a vaccine to widespread use as a COVID-19 treatment, if they prove effective.”For the treatment indication, particularly, this could go pretty fast,” he said in an interview. “If in August or September we’re seeing the people who got treated are not progressing to hospitalization, that would be powerful data and could lead to emergency use authorization.””So that puts you in the fall time: September, October, November is not unreasonable,” he said.last_img read more

Swans swoop for Meade

first_img Meade, 20, came through the youth ranks at Arsenal and started in the Champions League group game away to Olympiacos in December 2012, before leaving the Emirates Stadium in the summer at the end of his contract. The defender, who has signed a one-year deal at the Liberty Stadium, will initially train with the under-21s as he looks to force his way into contention for Michael Laudrup’s first-team plans. “I have been at Arsenal since I was 11, so to come to Swansea was the perfect move for me in terms of style,” Meade said on the club’s official website, www.swanseacity.net. “Swansea are a growing club and they’ve come from League Two by passing their way out of the divisions. “I think everyone has been very impressed by what they have achieved in the Premier League, and it’s great to be a part of the club. “The people in the area are very welcoming and I know it’s a family club too, which is great. “My aim is to start impressing in the Under-21s team and hopefully give Michael Laudrup another option at left-back for the first team. “He was a great player and the chance to learn from him is a massive opportunity for me. “The manager is not afraid to give youngsters a chance to prove themselves either. You only have to look at what Ben Davies achieved last season to realise that.” Swansea, who will compete in Europe next season following their Capital One Cup victory at Wembley, last week confirmed the signing of Ivory Coast international forward Wilfried Bony for a club-record £12million from Dutch side Vitesse Arnhem, to further bolster the squad following the arrival of Alejandro Pozuelo and Jonjo Shelvey. Swansea have signed former Arsenal left-back Jernade Meade on a free transfer, subject to international clearance and approval from the Barclays Premier League.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more