Reflections on a year

first_imgAs Harvard students drove away last month, their rear-view mirrors gave them one last glimpse of a campus that had housed yet another creative and spirited school year. The nine months from 2016–2017 brought a presidential election, scientific discoveries, artistic expression, and academic achievement. Here are some of the events that helped shape this passionate, vibrant community — and helped define the role that Harvard continues to play in the wider world.Freshmen Dominic Chung (from left), Emily Shen, Dominique Cantave, Eddie Nesmith, and Simi Ogunnowo greet each other in the Yard during Freshman Move-In Day. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer[vr url=https://news.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/1-360-move-in-day2017.jpg view=360]On Aug. 23, 2016, new students and their families flocked into Harvard Yard to find their freshman-year homes.The University’s newest students begin their freshman year in Tercentenary Theatre with Convocation and an official welcome from Harvard President Drew Faust. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerThe Class of 2020 gathers for a picture on the steps of Widener Hall. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerStudents enter Harvard Hall for classes during shopping period. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerMelissa Coles (from left), a student at Harvard Divinity School; the Ven. Professor Changshen Shi Wang, a visiting assistant professor at HDS; and Sara Klingenstein, a student at the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, talk in the courtyard of the Center for the Study of World Religions. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerTajrean Rahman ’20 (from left), Varoun Gulati ’19, and other students participate in Daniel Donoghue’s class “The History of the English Language” in Harvard Hall during shopping period. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer[vr url=https://news.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/widener360.jpg view=360]During exam period, students work under the iconic arched ceiling of Widener Library’s Loker Reading Room.Angela S. Allan, lecturer on history and literature, teaches “American Economic Fictions.” The course considers the culture of American capitalism by examining a range of literary and historical texts. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerDuring “Foundations of Biological Diversity,” Professor Brian Farrell, director of the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, teaches an integrated approach to the diversity of life, emphasizing how chemical, physical, genetic, ecological and geologic processes contribute to the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. The class was held inside the Science Center. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerJoy Davis teaches “Contemporary Dance: Countertechnique” during shopping period. Sophie Carroll ’17 (from left), Annina Kennedy-Yoon ’20, Davis, and Genevieve Lefevre ’19 gather for a class in the dance studio on Garden Street. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerInside Harvard University Herbaria’s Farlow Library, Hannah Zurier ’17 and Professor Don Pfister discuss an article about Zurier’s discovery of a new truffle fungus at the Arnold Arboretum. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerRowers on the Charles River. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerStudents dig into “The Archaeology of Harvard Yard,” a collaboration of the Anthropology Department and the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerEmily Balskus, the Morris Kahn Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, works inside the Edward Mallinckrodt Chemical Laboratory with postdoctoral fellow Matthew Wilson, (right). Balskus is the lead author of a study that gives researchers the first up-close view of how an enzyme called CutC breaks down choline, an essential nutrient in the makeup of cell membranes. Enzymes in the gut break down choline into TMA, which is linked with heart disease and liver disease. Understanding that process may help in the development of drugs to stop the process. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer.On Science Center Plaza, master pianist George Hu ’20 plays for his delighted friends Jonathan Suh (from left, all ’20), Daniel Inge, Michael Gaba, Arjun Mirani, and Elizabeth Yeoh-Wang, a joint Harvard/New England Conservatory concentrator. Harvard Common Spaces presented the free-to-play public piano as part of “Street Pianos Boston 2016,” in conjunction with Celebrity Series of Boston. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerThe Veritas shield on Robinson Gate is framed by foliage on a bright autumn day. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerOliver Hart, Andrew E. Furer Professor of Economics at Harvard University (right), and David Laibson, chair of the Department of Economics, smile after Hart won the 2016 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel. Hart shared the prize with Bengt Holmstršm, a Finnish economist teaching at MIT. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerDean of Students Katherine O’Dair (from left), Devin Clark ’18, and Dean of Freshmen Thomas A. Dingman concentrate on a Pac-Man game during a pop-up event at the Science Center. The event was intended to build community during the dining hall strike and featured life-sized versions of Connect Four, Operation, and Guitar Hero. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerLara Tomholt from the Graduate School of Design (left) explains her robot to local seventh-graders, including Giselle Korn (far right) from the Amigos School. The students were visiting campus to see what it’s like to be in college, as part of Project Teach. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerPresident Faust (from left) speaks with Rebecca Woo ’89 and Theresa Loong ’94 before making welcoming remarks at the inaugural Harvard Alumni Association’s Women’s Weekend at Spangler Hall. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerSergey Semenov poses for a portrait in his lab in the Mallinckrodt Chemistry Laboratory. Semenov’s research in complex organic chemical reactions on early Earth has led to new conclusions about the origin of life. Photo by Sarah SilbigerMembers of the Harvard Glee Club and Radcliffe Choral Group rehearse in Sanders Theatre for an upcoming holiday concert. Photo by Sarah Silbiger[vr url=https://news.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/3-360_winter_widenerf.jpg view=360]A fresh coat of snow covers Tercentenary Theatre during Wintersession, the last week of winter recess before the spring semester begins.Erica Beade instructs students on the art of drawing animals during a Wintersession offering at the Harvard Museum of Natural History. Jenny Huang ’20 (pictured) focuses on her subject as she draws. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerFreshmen William Gao and Amanda DiMartini experiment on yeast cells during James Martenson’s class “Genetics of Organelle Function in Budding Yeast.” Photo by Silvia MazzocchinBoris Davidov ’19 (front center) and Alannah O’Brien ’19 look over the Pusey Library archives exhibit “To Serve Better Thy Country.” Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerWilliam Frazer (left), a student at Miami Northwestern Senior High School, presents his original artwork to Harvard President Drew Faust. Frazer was among the many students and teachers who met Faust as she visited to discuss pathways to college, the value of higher education, and the importance of educators and mentors helping students consider opportunities after high school. Joe Sherman/Harvard UniversityThe Math Lounge on the fourth floor of the Science Center is open to all the math concentrators. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerAuthor and journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates was the keynote speaker at “Universities and Slavery: Bound by History,” a daylong conference in the Knafel Center at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. President Faust and Coates spoke after his presentation. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerFreshmen — aware of the camera — wait for upperclassmen to arrive with the letters that will assign them to their future House, on Housing Day, March 3. Photo by Silvia MazzocchinA student from Currier House leaves University Hall bearing letters for freshmen during Housing Day 2017. Photo by Silvia MazzocchinDuring her visit to Vietnam, President Faust met with students at the Ap Bac Secondary School, Tan An Hamlet in Cai Lay Town, Tien Giang Province. Faust (from left) asks a question to student Trần Thị Ngọc Hân, with help from translator Ben Wilkinson ’98. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerProfessor Danielle Allen welcomes people to “A Celebration of Inclusion and Belonging” at Sanders Theatre, a community-wide workshop and opportunity for reflection with students and scholars. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerUnder the cream-colored columns and ornate arches of the Widener Library Rotunda, Christopher Roman and Jill Johnson silently present “Catalogue (First Edition),” created by and with William Forsythe, their choreographer, teacher, mentor, and friend. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerA magnolia blooms in front of Lehman Hall. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerActor John Lithgow, co-founder of Arts First, receives the Mayor’s Proclamation. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff PhotographerDamian Woetzel teaches the audience George Balanchine’s “Serenade” during “A Celebration of Harvard Artists” at Sanders Theatre. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerGraduating seniors and their families attend Class Day Exercises in Tercentenary Theatre with featured speaker Joe Biden, the former U.S. vice president (left) with graduating senior Katherine Wu. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer[vr url=https://news.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/sheriff-360-commencement.jpg view=360]The Sheriff of Middlesex County continues a long tradition of bringing Commencement to order on May 25, 2017.Harvard University celebrates Commencement 2017. Before the Morning Exercises in Tercentenary Theatre, President Faust processes to the stage. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerAt the 366th Commencement, Mark Zuckerberg (left) receives his honorary degree from University Vice President Marc Goodheart. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographerlast_img read more

Update on the latest in sports:

first_imgLONDON (AP) — China has forfeited a Davis Cup tie because its men’s tennis team cannot travel to Romania next month.The International Tennis Federation cited “increased restrictions in response to the current coronavirus outbreak” for the decision.The death toll in mainland China due to the virus named COVID-19 had risen to almost 1,900 on Tuesday, with more than 72,000 confirmed cases. The outbreak has caused numerous sports events in China to be cancelled, postponed, or moved, and has affected the ability of Chinese teams to travel for competition. February 18, 2020 Jackson leaving PistonsDETROIT (AP) — The Detroit Pistons and Reggie Jackson have agreed on a contract buyout that allows the veteran guard to sign with another team.Jackson is in the final season of his five-year, $80 million deal he signed in 2015 with the Pistons, who acquired him earlier that year in a trade with Oklahoma City. The 29-year-old Jackson is averaging 14.9 points and 5.1 assists this season, but he has been limited to just 14 games due to a back injury.NHL-NEWSBouwmeester back in St. Louis Roush Fenway Racing released an update on its driver about 20 hours after Newman’s car slammed into the wall at nearly 200 mph, flipped, got T-boned by another car, flipped several more times and skidded to a halt in flames. Everyone watching feared the worst Monday night and had to wait nearly two hours to learn that Newman’s injuries were not considered life-threatening.NFL-NEWSBrees plans to be back with Saints next seasonUNDATED (AP) — Quarterback Drew Brees (breez) says he intends to play for the New Orleans Saints again next season. The 41-year-old Brees used a social media post to announce his intention to “make another run at it” in what would be his 20th NFL season.Brees is the NFL’s all-time leader with 6,867 completions, 77,416 yards passing and 547 touchdown throws. He was productive in leading the Saints to the playoffs last season despite missing five games with a throwing hand injury, completing 74.3% of his passes with 27 touchdowns and only four interceptions. Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditNASCAR-NEWMANNewman communicating following Daytona crashDAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — NASCAR driver Ryan Newman is awake and speaking with family and doctors a day after his horrific crash on the final lap of the Daytona 500. NCAA prepared to change transfer waiver processUNDATED (AP) — The NCAA is moving toward allowing all Division I athletes to transfer one time without sitting out a season of competition.A plan to change the waiver process is expected to be presented to the Division I Council in April. If adopted, new criteria would go into effect for the 2020-21 academic year. Currently, football, men’s and women’s basketball, men’s hockey and baseball players must sit out one season after transferring.The NCAA’s announcement comes a day after the ACC became the second Power Five conference to publicly support the so-called one-time exception for all transfers. The Big Ten announced its support last fall.NBA-PISTONS-JACKSON In other NFL news:— A person familiar with the situation says three-time Pro Bowl tight end Greg Olsen has agreed to a one-year, $7 million contract with the Seattle Seahawks. Olsen was released by the Carolina Panthers earlier this month after nine seasons with the team amid a rebuilding process under first-year coach Matt Rhule (rool). Olsen has caught 718 passes for 8,444 yards and 59 touchdowns during a 13-season NFL career that began with a four-year run with the Chicago Bears.— Punter Ryan Allen and kicker Younghoe Koo are set to return to the Falcons next season. Allen and Koo each joined the Falcons midway through the 2019 season and performed well enough to earn one-year contract extensions for the 2020 season.— The Cardinals have re-signed starting left tackle D.J. Humphries to a three-year contract that keeps him with the team through the 2022 season. The 26-year-old Humphries started all 16 games at left tackle last season, anchoring an offensive line that protects franchise quarterback Kyler Murray.COLLEGE SPORTS-TRANSFERS WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has pardoned Edward DeBartolo Jr., the former San Francisco 49ers owner convicted in a gambling fraud scandal.DeBartolo Jr. built the San Francisco 49ers’ 1980s-1990s dynasty. He was involved in one of the biggest owners’ scandals in the sport’s history. In 1998, he pleaded guilty to failing to report a felony when he paid $400,000 to former Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards in exchange for a riverboat gambling license.SOCCER-CHAMPIONS LEAGUEDortmund, Atlético winUNDATED (AP) — Borussia Dortmund and Atlético Madrid were winners in their first leg of the Champions League’s round of 16 today.center_img MLB-NEWSJudge doesn’t take batting practiceUNDATED (AP) — New York Yankees slugger Aaron Judge did not hit or throw during the team’s first full squad workout because of what the team said was a minor right shoulder issue.Yankees manager Aaron Boone said the problem is not considered serious and that Judge could start to ramp up activities in a couple days. Judge is expected to be ready for the start of the regular season.  Judge had been taking part in early workouts at the Yankees’ minor league complex and experienced some soreness in the last couple weeks. He shut down from hitting about a week ago. UNDATED (AP) — Blues defenseman Jay Bouwmeester (BOH’-mees-tur) is back in St. Louis after collapsing on the bench during a game in Anaheim last week.Bouwmeester issued a statement saying he’s “on the road to recovery” after going into cardiac arrest in the first period versus the Ducks. He had a cardioverter defibrillator implanted into his chest at UCI Medical Center in Orange County, California, where he had been hospitalized until returning to St. Louis on Sunday.The Blues put Bouwmeester on long-term injured reserve, which gives them salary-cap relief. They added blueline help by acquiring defenseman Marco Scandella from the Canadiens for a 2020 second-round pick and conditional fourth-rounder next year.Also in the NHL:— The Capitals have bolstered their blue line by acquiring veteran Brenden Dillon from the San Jose Sharks for Colorado’s 2020 second-round pick and a conditional 2021 third-rounder. Dillon has averaged just under 20 minutes a game this season and could play on the Capitals’ second pairing with Dmitry Orlov. The nine-year NHL veteran has scored 22 goals and 114 points in 588 regular-season games. Also in the majors:— MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred has apologized for what he called a disrespectful reference to the World Series trophy as a “piece of metal.” Even before being asked about it at the Cactus League media day, Manfred said he made a mistake with those comments when trying to deliver a rhetorical point in an interview two days earlier. Players became infuriated by his “piece of metal” comment during a lengthy interview with ESPN on Sunday, the same day he spoke in Florida.— Angels outfielder Brian Goodwin has asked an arbitration panel for a raise to $2.2 million and the team argued for $1.85 million. Goodwin hit .262 last year and set career bests with 17 homers and 47 RBIs in 458 plate appearances for the Angels after being claimed him off waivers from Kansas City last March. Teams are 6-1 in arbitration this season.NFL-TRUMP-DEBARTOLOTrump pardons former 49ers owner Update on the latest in sports: Erling Haaland scored twice as Borussia Dortmund beat Paris Saint-Germain 2-1. Haaland opened the scoring in the 69th minute and put the German team ahead for good two minutes after Neymar leveled the score for PSG.Midfielder Saúl Ñíguez netted in the fourth minute before Atlético held off defending-champion Liverpool, 1-0 on the same pitch the Reds won the title last spring. Liverpool had a goal by Mohamed Salah (SAH’-lah) waved off for offside.Gio Reyna became the youngest American to appear in the Champions League and assisted on the go-ahead goal for Dortmund. The 17-year-old son of former U.S. national team captain Claudio Reyna entered in the 67th minute.CHINA OUTBREAK-DAVIS CUPCoronavirus forces Davis Cup forfeit Associated Press last_img read more