David Rhodes’ Consent Will Receive Premiere Off-Broadway

first_imgConsent will premiere off-Broadway at The Black Box Theatre at the Harold and Miriam Steinberg Center for Theatre. The new play, penned and helmed by David Rhodes, will play a limited engagement beginning June 2; opening night is scheduled for June 11.The cast of Consent will include Catherine Curtin (Orange Is The New Black, The Lady of Dubuque, Love, Janis), Michael Goldstein (Belgrade Trilogy), Mark McCullough Thomas (Our Lady of 121st Street, Guiding Light) and Angela Pierce (You Don’t Know Jack, Unburden).Ron Sullivan, former pro-NFL player and award-winning architect, is experimenting with sexual freedom in his SoHo loft. Done with coming out and nearly divorced from his high school sweetheart, Ron has a chance encounter with Kurt, a hot Yale law student, that pushes him to the edge of his sexual boundaries…or beyond them. The passion that follows transforms both men, and ripples into the lives of Ron’s wife and his sister Emily. Emily questions the ethics and risks of sex games, but it’s ultimately up to the audience to determine who is seducing whom in the murky realm of power play and consent.The production will feature scenic design by Scott Tedmon-Jones, costume design by Izzy Fields, lighting design by John Eckert, sound design by Chad Raines, video design by Chelsie McPhilimy and props by Addison Herren.Consent is not a production of Roundabout Theatre Company although it is playing in a Roundabout space. View Commentslast_img read more

Kogan

first_imgKogan CELEBRATING 15 YEARS as the self described “rebellious group” of the Bar, the Public Interest Law Section recently honored two legal giants with one award. PILS established the Chesterfield Smith Public Interest Law Lifetime Achievement Award, to honor the late president of both the ABA and The Florida Bar, and named former Supreme Court Justice Gerald Kogan as its first recipient. “To be compared with Chesterfield Smith is indeed an honor that I never would have expected in my lifetime,” Kogan said at the PILS luncheon in Miami. “To call Chesterfield Smith a hero, that is correct. To mention me in the same breath as Chesterfield as a fellow hero, I don’t know if I could ever live up to that particular designation.” But PILS Chair Carolyn Salisbury deemed both lawyers heroes as she focused on their philosophies about making pro bono legal work mandatory for all licensed lawyers. At the PILS luncheon in 2003, just months before his death, Smith said in his keynote address: “We, as lawyers, cannot simply work for ourselves and our deep-pocketed clients. We, as lawyers, must discharge our professional obligations always to help provide access to the legal system for all citizens.” Similarly, Salisbury quoted from Kogan’s dissent when the court did not adopt mandatory pro bono more than a decade ago: “The people most seriously affected by this court’s action today are the ones who are not present, the people who cannot afford an attorney and thus cannot afford to appear before us to argue their side of this issue. These are the people that because of the economics of our legal system have been excluded from the same level of legal services available to more affluent residents of Florida.. . . As attorneys, we are all too often seen by the public as dour and greedy. Try as we may, we will never shake this unseemly image until we have demonstrated to the public that we take our constitution seriously and that we will live up to a dictate even if it diminishes our own pocketbooks. The time has come to do just that.” Pictured from the left are Jackie Allee Smith, Smith’s widow, Kogan, and his wife, Irene. March 15, 2005 Regular Newslast_img read more